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'Be a winner, be a Tea drinker'

Tea Campaign

Tea promotion campaign by Indian Tea Association

 
 

COND...

WESTERN TEA PARTY...
In the 16th Century, when European traders and missionaries began to visit the Orient, word of this magic beverage spread to the west. England was introduced to tea by the Dutch in the early 1600s, but it remained a drink of the aristocrats till the coffee houses started advertising it variously as a cure-all, an elixir, a longevity drink and most important of all, as an alternative to coffee. It was considered a man's drink till Chales II's consort, Catherine introduced it as the fashionable breakfast drink to replace ale.

Russians became enamoured with the new drink around the same time, which was brought by camel caravans trekking across Mongolia. North Americans learned about brewing in the mid 17th Century when the Dutch settled on the small island of New York, but the new settlers preferred boiling the leaves and eating them with salt and butter rather than drinking.

Within a hundred years of its introduction to Great Britain, tea had become an international commodity with lavish tea gardens everywhere with hawkers in street corners selling it, but its popularity in America imploded when the British government levied a special tax on teas destined for colonies. The colonies bocotted it, tea sales plummeted, and it ended in the famous Boston Tea Party of December 1773 where tea chests were dunked in the harbour, setting the stage for the American Revolution.

AND IT LIVED HAPPILY EVER AFTER....
Now, in the 21st Century, tea is a universal beverage, with a presence in millions of people's daily lives - a staple diet in some countries, a ritual in others, equivalent of a handshake for some, a way of telling time in England, and by far, the most powerful and popular beverage in the world after water.